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Family, friends gather to celebrate life of cancer patient flown back home in her final days

Margie Walter died Oct. 12

James Lynch

Q13 FOX News Reporter

12:24 AM EDT, October 29, 2012

RENTON, Wash.

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First, friends and family banded together to bring Margie Walter back home.

And on Sunday, they joined each other at Coulan Park in Renton to remember and celebrate the life of the 33-year-old woman.

"I remember I'd always tell her that I loved you long before she loved me and long before we were even together, she would always say you're crazy," Walter's husband Eric said.

Walter was diagnosed two years ago with Stage 3 breast cancer. After a few rounds of treatment, she was told by her doctors the cancer had spread to her bones and wasn't curable. That's when she decided to head to Hawaii with her husband and her daughters, ages 6 and 8, for one last family trip.

But while the family was in Hawaii her condition worsened to the point she was unable to take a commercial flight home.To reserve a medical flight, her family scraped together what money they could from life savings, credit cards, and even their daughters' college funds.

But the nonprofit group Band of Brothers Northwest stepped in. Formed in 2010, Band of Brothers Northwest was formed as a men’s growth group through Eastlake Community Church. It later evolved into a “wish list” to help others in need.

The group set up a Facebook page for the public to donate to the Walter family and bring Margie home. It raised more than $60,000. Margie did manage to take a flight back home, and she died in Seattle on Oct. 12.

Many of those who donated to help bring Walter home were at her memorial Sunday. Those, like her brother Josh Braun, said she will live on in the hearts and minds of people she touched.

"She was as beautiful inside as she was out and I always tell people that didn't get a chance to meet her that it's a shame because she was the type of person that could change you," Braun said.