World grieves over Noregian tragedy

Norwegians from around the world are grieving and trying to make sense of a horrible series of attacks that claimed nearly 90 lives.  A Norwegian man has been arrested and is accused of a bomb blast in Oslo that killed seven and wounded many others.

The suspect has also been linked to a shooting spree at a political youth camp nearby.  The news was met with shock from many who have ties to the country.

“It must have been horrible and very confusing,” Norwegian Consul Kim Nesselquist said.  “They were scrambling, they were hiding, they were swimming.  They did everything they could to get off the island.”

Western Washington has the fourth highest Norwegian population in the country.  Friday, many who visited Ballard's Nordic Heritage Museum talked about the attacks.

“It's a turning point in Norwegian history,” said Line Sandsmark.  Sandsmark is a project manager at the museum and emigrated to the northwest from Norway.  “I think what a lot of people feel is a loss of innocence.”

Norway is known for hosting the Nobel Peace Prize and Sandsmark described the people there as “soft-spoken and reserved”.

It appears the shooter is one of their own, a “homegrown terrorist” as they're known in the U.S.  There is talk the attacks were politically motivated.  Sandsmark said most people there would never consider such extreme measures.

“People are choked up and shocked,” she said.   “To see that this one person is responsible for so much destruction is a profound tragedy for the whole country.”