George Harasz

The criminal charges against George Harasz, a former Glastonbury man who'd been accused of sexually assaulting boys he and his former husband adopted through the state Department of Children and Families, were dismissed. (Courtesy of East Hartford Police Department / September 4, 2014)

EAST HARTFORD — A Glastonbury man who faces trial later this month for allegedly sexually assaulting children he adopted through the state was charged Wednesday with violating a judge's order that he stay away from his alleged victims.

George Harasz, 51, was found outside the home of one of his accusers, East Hartford police said. A judge earlier had ordered Harasz to have no contact with his alleged victims and to stay at least 100 yards away from them.

Police said Harasz told them he was in the area visiting someone else.

Harasz posted $10,000 bail and was arraigned Thursday at Superior Court in Manchester on two counts of violating a court protective order. He was ordered back to court Sept. 19 in Hartford, the day his trial is scheduled to begin.

Harasz and his then-husband, Douglas Wirth, 46, were charged in November 2011 with sexually assaulting some of the nine boys they adopted through the state Department of Children and Families. The boys, from three sibling groups, were removed from the care of Wirth and Harasz before the men were arrested.

After their arrest, both men were ordered not to have contact with the boys and to stay away from them.

From the start, some of the couple's children defended Wirth and Harasz, insisting the allegations were groundless. Subsequent accusations against the couple were investigated and, in some cases, found not to be credible.

The men will be tried separately, but are scheduled for trial before Judge Julia D. Dewey this month.

Wirth's trial on charges of first-degree sexual assault, third-degree sexual assault and risk of injury to a minor is scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Harasz's trial on three counts of first-degree sexual assault and two counts of risk of injury to a minor will follow Wirth's. Both men waived their right to a jury trial so Dewey will determine their guilt or innocence.

Harasz's lawyer, Hubert J. Santos, could not be reached for comment Thursday.