The 11 officers that the city's inspector general recommended be fired

The Office of Inspector General recommended that 11 Chicago police officers — from rank-and-file patrol officers to command-level personnel — be fired for making false statements exaggerating the threat posed by Laquan McDonald. All the higher-ranking officers resigned or retired, leaving four officers and one patrol sergeant fighting for their jobs. Here is a look at all 11:

Officer Jason Van Dyke

Van Dyke, an officer since June 2001, shot McDonald 16 times seconds after exiting his squad car. He emptied his gun, firing most of the bullets after McDonald had fallen to the street. Van Dyke told police he opened fire after McDonald ignored his repeated commands to drop the knife and then raised the knife over his shoulder as he got within 10 to 12 feet of the officer. He said that McDonald appeared to be trying to get up after falling to the street. On the same day a judge ordered the video released, Van Dyke was indicted on first-degree murder charges. He refused to answer questions from the IG, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. He continues to fight the murder charges in court as well as his dismissal before the Chicago Police Board.

Officer Joseph Walsh

Walsh, on the force since June 1998 and Van Dyke's partner for only the second time that night, gave much the same account as Van Dyke. The IG found Walsh made numerous false statements and material omissions in his interview with police and the Independent Police Review Authority. "Walsh's actions embody the 'code of silence' that has no legitimate place in CPD," the report concluded. Walsh resigned from the department after the IG recommended his dismissal.

David McNaughton

McNaughton, with the department since December 1991 and the highest-ranking officer at the scene as a deputy chief, told IG investigators that his initial reaction to seeing the video at the scene was "Oh, my God, you know this is, you know, something to see." But then he said he looked at it from "the perspective of a police officer" and concluded McDonald was the aggressor who approached Van Dyke and Walsh. The IG in particular faulted McNaughton for revising the department's news release on the shooting to say McDonald "continued to approach" the two officers. "I do not believe it is a false statement in my heart of hearts," he said in his IG interview. McNaughton retired after the IG recommended his dismissal.

Eugene Roy

Roy, with the department since 1977 and the second-in-charge that night as commander of the Area Central detective division, attended a meeting two days after the shooting in which then-Superintendent Garry McCarthy raised concerns about the 16 shots fired by Van Dyke. Roy later told IG investigators he did not share those concerns. Despite what the video showed, Roy continued to maintain that the police reports on the shooting were truthful and accurate, but he disavowed any responsibility for their conclusions. Roy retired in September after the IG recommended his dismissal.

Detective David March

March, the lead investigator into McDonald's shooting who joined the department in June 1982, viewed the video several times on a monitor in the police car whose dashcam captured the shooting, according to the IG report. He told IG investigators he interviewed not only Van Dyke and Walsh but also the additional eight officers at the scene at the time of the shooting. The IG in particular faulted March for falsely telling the medical examiner's office that McDonald had lunged at the officer with the knife. Under questioning by an IG investigator, March said he wouldn't change how he wrote anything in a supplementary police report. March resigned in August after the IG recommended his dismissal.

Sgt. Daniel Gallagher

Gallagher, who started with the department in October 2000 and was March's boss at the Area Central detective division, supervised the investigation into McDonald's shooting. Under questioning by an IG investigator, Gallagher said McDonald had taken 10 to 12 steps toward Van Dyke and Walsh before Van Dyke opened fire. Asked if video backed up Van Dyke's claim he continued firing as McDonald attempted to rise up from the street, Gallagher said, "Perception is reality in these cases. If that's what an officer perceives ... there is nothing in the video to refute that." Gallagher resigned in August after the IG recommended his dismissal.

Sgt. Stephen Franko

Franko, with the department since January 1994, supervised several of the first officers who responded to the incident. The IG alleged that several witnesses said Franko helped create the false police reports and approved another report that inaccurately said Van Dyke had been injured. In his interview with investigators, Franko said he had simply overlooked mention of the injury in the report and otherwise minimized his role at the scene. The IG also faulted him for failing to take appropriate action against officers under his supervision after learning none of the audio systems in their police cars worked. Franko is fighting his dismissal before the Chicago Police Board.

Officer Janet Mondragon

Mondragon, an officer since April 2007, had told police she heard Van Dyke and Walsh repeatedly order McDonald to drop the knife but that McDonald continued to wave the knife as he came closer and closer to the officers. She said she did not see which officer opened fire because she was putting the squad car in park — a claim that the inspector general scoffed at, noting it took Van Dyke about 14 seconds to unload his 16-shot gun. The IG also criticized Mondragon for remembering being served pizza later that night at Area Central headquarters but answering nearly 150 questions about the details of the shooting by saying she didn't recall. Mondragon is fighting her dismissal before the Chicago Police Board.

Officer Daphne Sebastian

Sebastian, Mondragon's partner that night and an officer since April 2007, gave a similar account. She had told police she heard Van Dyke and Walsh repeatedly order McDonald to drop the knife, but he continued to advance on the officers, waving the knife. Sebastian also said she didn't see which officer fired multiple shots, but she reported McDonald continued to move after falling to the street — a key detail that could have justified Van Dyke's continuing to fire at the prone McDonald. Yet the video shows that McDonald's lower body did not move at all, the IG found, and the small, intermittent movements to his upper body appear to be from the bullets striking his body. Sebastian is fighting her dismissal before the Chicago Police Board.

Officer Ricardo Viramontes

Viramontes, an officer since October 2003, arrived on the scene as Van Dyke was shooting McDonald. He had told police Van Dyke opened fire after McDonald had ignored repeated commands to drop the knife and turned toward the officer and his partner. Viramontes also said he saw McDonald continue to move after falling to the street. He went even further, saying McDonald attempted to rise to his feet with the knife still in his hand. After being shown the video, Viramontes stood his ground, saying, "The video might show me differently, but I believe what I stated is what I thought I saw." Viramontes is fighting his dismissal before the Chicago Police Board.

Officer Dora Fontaine

Fontaine, an officer since October 2001 and Viramontes' longtime partner on the force, was the only officer to challenge any statements attributed to her in police reports. She denied telling a detective that night that she had seen the knife-wielding McDonald raise his right arm toward Van Dyke as if he was attacking the officer. Still, the inspector general recommended Fontaine be fired for saying she heard Van Dyke and Walsh repeatedly order McDonald to drop the knife after video showed her just arriving at the scene as Van Dyke opened fire. Superintendent Eddie Johnson, however, did not seek her firing, saying the evidence against her was insufficient. It was uncertain what, if any, discipline was sought.

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