Timber Rattlesnake

THE DANGER:  The Timber Rattlesnake, scientific name crotalus horridus, is one of two poisonous snakes that can be found in <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100200000000" title="Connecticut" href="/topic/us/connecticut-PLGEO100100200000000.topic">Connecticut</a>.  The Timber primarily makes its home in Litchfield county, particularly in the northwest corner of the state near the <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100800000000" title="New York" href="/topic/us/new-york-PLGEO100100800000000.topic">New York</a> border.  Timbers can grow to up to 54 inches, have poisonous venom but are primarily docile creatures.<br>
<br>
PREVENTION: Prevention is as simple as identifying which varieties of snakes are poisonous, which are not and making a concerted effort to avoid the former.  The Timber Rattlesnake can be identified by its distinct pattern of black markings.  The Timber can also be identified by the rattles at the end of its tail.  The rattles are composed of a series of nested, hollow beads which are actually modified scales from the tail tip. Each time the snake sheds its skin, a new rattle segment is added.  If you are bitten by a Timber Rattlesnake, seek medical attention as soon as possible.<br>
<br>
Read the Connecticut DEP's <a href="http://www.ct.gov/dep/lib/dep/wildlife/pdf_files/nongame/snkwebview.pdf" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">guide</a> to snakes in Connecticut for more information.

( Tami Chappell, Getty Images / September 5, 2001 )

THE DANGER: The Timber Rattlesnake, scientific name crotalus horridus, is one of two poisonous snakes that can be found in Connecticut. The Timber primarily makes its home in Litchfield county, particularly in the northwest corner of the state near the New York border. Timbers can grow to up to 54 inches, have poisonous venom but are primarily docile creatures.

PREVENTION: Prevention is as simple as identifying which varieties of snakes are poisonous, which are not and making a concerted effort to avoid the former. The Timber Rattlesnake can be identified by its distinct pattern of black markings. The Timber can also be identified by the rattles at the end of its tail. The rattles are composed of a series of nested, hollow beads which are actually modified scales from the tail tip. Each time the snake sheds its skin, a new rattle segment is added. If you are bitten by a Timber Rattlesnake, seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Read the Connecticut DEP's guide to snakes in Connecticut for more information.

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook
CTnow is using Facebook comments on stories. To comment on ctnow.com articles, sign into Facebook and enter your comment in the field below. Comments will appear in your Facebook News Feed unless you choose otherwise. To report spam or abuse, click the X next to the comment. For guidelines on commenting, click here.

CONSUMER COLUMNISTS

Kevin Hunt - The Electronic Jungle

Kevin Hunt: Rocki Play, A $49 Streamer, Brings Music From Smartphone To Speakers - September 8, 2014 - For a colorful little music streamer with 17 sides (at last count) and a bust-out Kickstarter funding campaign, the Rocki Play isn't...

Gail MarksJarvis

Benefits, not just paychecks, have fallen on hard times - September 11, 2014 - Paychecks have been disappointing investors for years, but that's not all that's been putting pressure on household spending.

David Lazarus

Your privacy, their paycheck - September 18, 2014 - Ann Howe's phone was ringing frequently, but the calls weren't for her. They were for someone bearing the last name of Rapp.

Korky Vann

Connecticut Venues With A View Of The Season's Foliage - September 18, 2014 - I love our state's fall foliage. What I don't like is fighting traffic jams on country roads, or worse, hiking up some dusty path to see...

Advertisement

...