David and Dorothy met in art school after <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="EVHST00000110" title="World War II (1939-1945)" href="/topic/unrest-conflicts-war/wars-interventions/world-war-ii-%281939-1945%29-EVHST00000110.topic">World War II</a>. He was a precocious painter who had mastered the then-popular illustration style of <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PEHST001703" title="Norman Rockwell" href="/topic/arts-culture/norman-rockwell-PEHST001703.topic">Norman Rockwell</a>. She taught silk-screen printing.  "I didn't take her class, but I dated her for a couple of years," he says, "and then she gave me the ultimatum."  They married in 1953. Weidman pored over magazine advertisements at the library, learning about building materials: cinder block, Douglas fir beams and panels, louvered windows, sliding doors, cork flooring and mahogany cabinetry. With the Weidman-designed built-ins, the house is filled with a lifetime of souvenirs but remains a compelling example of Midcentury open-plan living.

( Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times / July 17, 2014 )

David and Dorothy met in art school after World War II. He was a precocious painter who had mastered the then-popular illustration style of Norman Rockwell. She taught silk-screen printing. "I didn't take her class, but I dated her for a couple of years," he says, "and then she gave me the ultimatum." They married in 1953. Weidman pored over magazine advertisements at the library, learning about building materials: cinder block, Douglas fir beams and panels, louvered windows, sliding doors, cork flooring and mahogany cabinetry. With the Weidman-designed built-ins, the house is filled with a lifetime of souvenirs but remains a compelling example of Midcentury open-plan living.

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