Weidman's work in cartoon animation and print illustration put food on the table but didn't satisfy his artistic ambitions. Inspired by Matisse, Picasso, Chagall and <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PEHST001826" title="Ben Shahn" href="/topic/arts-culture/ben-shahn-PEHST001826.topic">Ben Shahn</a>, he took up silk-screen printing in the 1960s and pushed the medium forward with innovative techniques. "I was the best thief in the business," says Weidman, pictured here in his studio. "I would steal right and left but intelligently, without leaving fingerprints, in such a way that it became mine."  Weidman’s prints spanned moods and styles. Some looked like woodcut prints or pen-and-ink cartoons. Others had the imprint of Scandinavian design or some other ethnic decoration. Humor and a genuine affection for the world informed most of his work.

( Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times )

Weidman's work in cartoon animation and print illustration put food on the table but didn't satisfy his artistic ambitions. Inspired by Matisse, Picasso, Chagall and Ben Shahn, he took up silk-screen printing in the 1960s and pushed the medium forward with innovative techniques. "I was the best thief in the business," says Weidman, pictured here in his studio. "I would steal right and left but intelligently, without leaving fingerprints, in such a way that it became mine." Weidman’s prints spanned moods and styles. Some looked like woodcut prints or pen-and-ink cartoons. Others had the imprint of Scandinavian design or some other ethnic decoration. Humor and a genuine affection for the world informed most of his work.

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