Morning Prayer

Christian students gather for a morning prayer Monday in the Lincoln County High School library. A recent controversy over the role of prayer during the school's upcoming graduation has created a new focus on the First Amendment and the rights it bestows on students to express their beliefs. Religious meetings like this morning prayer or a student praying during graduation are constitutionally protected activities, but the school also has a responsibility not to officially endorse any religion. Because six graduating seniors have said they do not want prayer to be a part of their graduation, the school cannot allow the traditional time it usually does for a prayer. But the U.S. Constitution guarantees students will still be allowed to pray if they choose to.

( Ben Kleppinger / ben@theinteriorjournal.com / May 9, 2013 )

Christian students gather for a morning prayer Monday in the Lincoln County High School library. A recent controversy over the role of prayer during the school's upcoming graduation has created a new focus on the First Amendment and the rights it bestows on students to express their beliefs. Religious meetings like this morning prayer or a student praying during graduation are constitutionally protected activities, but the school also has a responsibility not to officially endorse any religion. Because six graduating seniors have said they do not want prayer to be a part of their graduation, the school cannot allow the traditional time it usually does for a prayer. But the U.S. Constitution guarantees students will still be allowed to pray if they choose to.

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