Merritt Parkway

<b>By Anonymous | Hartford Courant</b>
<b>HOW IT GOT ITS NAME:</b> The winding, tree-lined road was named for banker and U.S. Rep. Schuyler Merritt, who advocated the construction of the parkway as a pleasant alternative to heavily traveled U.S. Route 1, the Boston Post Road.
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<b>CONSTRUCTION:</b> Groundbreaking occurred July 1, 1934, and the first portion of the road, from the New York state line to Norwalk, opened in 1938. The rest, from Norwalk to the Housatonic River in Stratford, was completed in 1940.
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<b>DID YOU KNOW?</b> The 37.5-mile parkway is known for its nearly 70 ornamental bridges, created in a variety of architectural styles. In 1991, the Merritt was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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<b>Sources:</b> The Hartford Courant; Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

( Courant File Photo / July 25, 2014 )

By Anonymous | Hartford Courant HOW IT GOT ITS NAME: The winding, tree-lined road was named for banker and U.S. Rep. Schuyler Merritt, who advocated the construction of the parkway as a pleasant alternative to heavily traveled U.S. Route 1, the Boston Post Road.

CONSTRUCTION: Groundbreaking occurred July 1, 1934, and the first portion of the road, from the New York state line to Norwalk, opened in 1938. The rest, from Norwalk to the Housatonic River in Stratford, was completed in 1940.

DID YOU KNOW? The 37.5-mile parkway is known for its nearly 70 ornamental bridges, created in a variety of architectural styles. In 1991, the Merritt was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Sources: The Hartford Courant; Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

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