Inspired by the upcoming release of "Fast & Furious 6," the latest installment in the blockbuster action franchise, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has announced it will create a sequel to Operation Fast & Furious, its 2009 botched gun-trafficking sting operation that resulted in more than 2,000 guns being allowed to end up in the hands of violent Mexican drug cartels.

According to ATF acting director B. Todd Jones, he is confident that in the tradition of the "Fast & Furious" franchise, with each film being bigger than the last, the government's Operation 2 Fast 2 Furious will be extremely successful.

"The reason we named the original operation Fast and Furious was because we were making it up as we went along, just like the script for the movie franchise," Jones told Hollywood & Swine. "Unfortunately, due to our incompetence, we should have named the operation after another Vin Diesel film, "Babylon A.D.," since it was a total failure that everyone is still trying to forget about."

Operation 2 Fast 2 Furious will be the first to be named after an action film since the Justice Dept.'s Operation Expendables, which was responsible for firing all the inept law enforcement officials who had any involvement with the original Operation Fast & Furious.

ATF officials were hoping to convince "Fast & Furious 6" helmer Justin Lin to direct their newest gun-trafficking sting operation, but he turned it down.

"Fast & Furious 6" star Paul Walker believes the ATF is doing the right thing by ignoring critics and continuing the Fast and Furious operations.

"When 'The Fast and the Furious' first came out, a lot of people dismissed it as a rip-off of 'Point Break,'" Walker said. "And if the ATF just keeps churning out Fast and Furious sting operations, no one will even remember what happened in the first one, just like no one remembers what happened in the last few 'Fast & Furious' films."

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