The 74th Golden Globe Awards take place Sunday, Jan. 8 with Jimmy Fallon taking on hosting duties. "La La Land," with seven nominations, "Moonlight," with six and "Manchester by the Sea," with five nominations are film frontrunners. In TV, the heart-warming "This is Us" series scored more nominations than bloody, crowd favorite "Game of Thrones." New TV was certainly the trend, "Atlanta," "Insecure," and "Westworld" all racked up nominations showcasing lots of talent and fresh creators.

The biggest surprise? Multiple nods for comic book underdog movie "Deadpool."

Scroll down for all the reactions and predictions for the big night.



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Told ya so: Golden Globe TV nominees according to our critics

The Golden Globes have a reputation for taking chances and honoring new television shows. This year's class of nominees, announced Monday morning, was no exception. From "Stranger Things" to "This Is Us," here is what The Times' critics had to say about some of 2016's new and noteworthy shows.

Kevin (Justin Hartley) has a 36th birthday crisis in "This Is Us." (Ron Batzdorff / NBC)
Kevin (Justin Hartley) has a 36th birthday crisis in "This Is Us." (Ron Batzdorff / NBC)

"This is Us":
"The success of most every series rests on the appeal of its characters, and 'This Is Us' appears to be full of appealing characters." Full review here.

"Westworld":
"It isn’t just great television, it’s vivid, thought-provoking television that entertains even as it examines the darker side of entertainment." Full review here

Winona Ryder, left, Charlie Heaton and Natalia Dyer in Netflix's "Stranger Things." (Netflix)
Winona Ryder, left, Charlie Heaton and Natalia Dyer in Netflix's "Stranger Things." (Netflix)

"Stranger Things":
"'Stranger Things' doesn’t just star 1980s icon Winona Ryder; it stars 1980s icon Winona Ryder in a brown corduroy coat." Full review here.

"The Crown":
"[It] unfurls  in intimate conversations, usually between two people, one of whom is trying to roll a ball forward while the other is trying to keep it back." Full review here.

"Atlanta":
"...sets a tone that is a little melancholic but not pessimistic; it’s aspirational in a minor key. It is critical in an interested, even amazed, way about people, while managing not to judge them." Full review here.

Donald Glover, from left, Brian Tyree Henry and Lakeith Stanfield are three friends looking to better themselves in Glover's new FX comedy, "Atlanta." (Guy D'Alema / FX)
Donald Glover, from left, Brian Tyree Henry and Lakeith Stanfield are three friends looking to better themselves in Glover's new FX comedy, "Atlanta." (Guy D'Alema / FX)

"Divorce":
"It’s an intelligent, if sometimes taxing or manipulative show, well played, often funny, here and there lovely; it improves as it goes along, letting us get to like characters who can first seem a little hateful." Full review here.

"Goliath":
"At its best, 'Goliath' suggests the creative possibilities that arise when writers steeped in the broadcast television tradition are liberated to tell heavily serialized, character-driven, morally complicated stories without the arbitrary limitations imposed by networks." Full review here.

"Insecure":
"Much of it takes place in neighborhoods television typically visits only in crime stories, with the difference that there are no crime stories here, just the getting on with life, love, work, acceptance and self-acceptance." Full review here.

Issa Rae plays a young woman uncertain about her future in HBO's "Insecure," a new series co-created by Rae and Larry Wilmore. (Anne Marie Fox / HBO)
Issa Rae plays a young woman uncertain about her future in HBO's "Insecure," a new series co-created by Rae and Larry Wilmore. (Anne Marie Fox / HBO)

"The Night Of":
"An anthem to television’s unique power to turn a series of understated performances into sustained magnificence." Full review here

"Graves":
"It is cynical enough, vaguely, about politics to suggest that it takes an outsider to do things right, a notion that does fit the temper of the times." Full review here.

"The Night Manager":
"Unapologetically sleeker and more sentimental than any George Smiley tale, and streamlined to the point of simplicity..., it is tense but linear, clearly framed to take full advantage of its stars' strengths and, it must be said, their cross-demographic fan base." Full review here.

Hugh Laurie as Richard Onslow Roper in "The Night Manager." (Des Willie / Ink Factory / AMC Network)
Hugh Laurie as Richard Onslow Roper in "The Night Manager." (Des Willie / Ink Factory / AMC Network)

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