Gillette Train

In the early 1930's, William Gillette had two narrow guage trains built for his Medieval retreat on the Connecticut River. In the 1940's the trains were sold to Lake Compounce where they remained in use for more than 50 years before they were donated back to Gillette Castle State Park. The trains were in very rough shape and needed complete restoration. Ted Tine, a custom motorcycle and auto restorer in Chester, completed the detailed restoration of the electric train which was officially unveiled Friday afternoon at Gillette Castle where it will be on permanent display. In photo, steam billows from the stack of the restored miniature train as William Douglass, left, and Nick Tomasone, right, remove the parachute covering the train during the unveiling ceremony.

( Stephen Dunn / Hartford Courant )

In the early 1930's, William Gillette had two narrow guage trains built for his Medieval retreat on the Connecticut River. In the 1940's the trains were sold to Lake Compounce where they remained in use for more than 50 years before they were donated back to Gillette Castle State Park. The trains were in very rough shape and needed complete restoration. Ted Tine, a custom motorcycle and auto restorer in Chester, completed the detailed restoration of the electric train which was officially unveiled Friday afternoon at Gillette Castle where it will be on permanent display. In photo, steam billows from the stack of the restored miniature train as William Douglass, left, and Nick Tomasone, right, remove the parachute covering the train during the unveiling ceremony.

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