1916: HUGHES LEADS IN HOT FIGHT: Wilson, seeking re-election on a peace platform against Republican challenger and former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, appeared to be losing badly on election night when the newspaper printed. Hughes had built up an impressive 248-210 electoral vote lead, according to the Nov. 8 Tribune, which bore the judicious headline: "HUGHES LEADS IN HOT FIGHT." A number of other newspapers reportedly declared Hughes the victor that night. As we all know, Wilson eked out the victory, capturing nearly all of the outstanding states. The Tribune's headline the next day was: "WILSON HOLDS HIS LEAD." Besides the traditional, all-caps banner headline, the report included a prominent BULLETINS box that carried news from around the country. Making his debut this year was Arthur Sears Henning, who wrote the lead story and would become the dean of Washington bureau chiefs.

( Chicago Tribune )

1916: HUGHES LEADS IN HOT FIGHT: Wilson, seeking re-election on a peace platform against Republican challenger and former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, appeared to be losing badly on election night when the newspaper printed. Hughes had built up an impressive 248-210 electoral vote lead, according to the Nov. 8 Tribune, which bore the judicious headline: "HUGHES LEADS IN HOT FIGHT." A number of other newspapers reportedly declared Hughes the victor that night. As we all know, Wilson eked out the victory, capturing nearly all of the outstanding states. The Tribune's headline the next day was: "WILSON HOLDS HIS LEAD." Besides the traditional, all-caps banner headline, the report included a prominent BULLETINS box that carried news from around the country. Making his debut this year was Arthur Sears Henning, who wrote the lead story and would become the dean of Washington bureau chiefs.

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