Sue's skull scan

<a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLCUL000149" title="Field Museum of Natural History" href="/topic/science/scientific-research/field-museum-of-natural-history-PLCUL000149.topic">Field Museum</a> scientist Chris Brochu, right, with the skull of Sue the dinosaur. The skull has been sprayed with a polyurethane foam and crated for shipping to an undisclosed site where it will receive a computed tomographic (CT) scan. Museum carpenter Sheldon Moy, left, was assisted by Henry Tucker, Jr. in building the crate. Sections of the rear of the 1,800-pound skull are only 1mm to 2mm thick, said Brochu, making it "like one giant chocolate <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="12014002" title="Easter" href="/topic/religion-belief/easter-12014002.topic">Easter</a> rabbit."

( Tribune photo by Terrence Antonio James / August 20, 1998 )

Field Museum scientist Chris Brochu, right, with the skull of Sue the dinosaur. The skull has been sprayed with a polyurethane foam and crated for shipping to an undisclosed site where it will receive a computed tomographic (CT) scan. Museum carpenter Sheldon Moy, left, was assisted by Henry Tucker, Jr. in building the crate. Sections of the rear of the 1,800-pound skull are only 1mm to 2mm thick, said Brochu, making it "like one giant chocolate Easter rabbit."

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook

PLAN AHEAD

Top Trending Videos