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Man attacked by three assailants along Back River Neck Road [Crime Log]

A Baltimore man suffered serious injury after he was reportedly gouged in the eye during an attack in Essex on Feb. 6, according to police.

Between 1 and 2 a.m. the man, who was standing in the unit block of Back River Neck Road, was attacked by three other men, according to a Baltimore County police report. One assailant struck his eye with an unidentified weapon, another hit him in the head with an object and the third kicked him in the head.

The victim received medical treatment at a nearby hospital. The attack was reported to police last Monday night.

In addition to this incident, other recent Baltimore County police reports from the area include:

Grantwood Road, 700 block, 6:14 p.m. Feb. 11. A car was stolen. Police said the victim had left the vehicle running and unlocked as he was delivering food in the area.

Biggs Road, 9600 block, between 9 a.m. Feb. 12 and 3:18 a.m. Feb. 13. A video game system and video game were stolen from a residence.

Corsica Road, 2200 block, between 11 p.m. Feb. 12 and 12:33 a.m. Feb. 14. A BMW was stolen from a residence.

Eastern Boulevard, 1600 block, between 6:20 a.m. and 6:40 a.m. Feb. 15. Someone broke into The Gun Shop by forcing open a side door. It was not immediately known if firearms were missing.

Chandelle Road, unit block, between 12 a.m. Oct. 15, 2013 and 12 a.m. Feb. 14. A large amount of copper wire was cut from a cell tower site.

Tangier Drive, 1400 block, between 5:30 p.m. Feb. 10 and 12:54 a.m. Feb. 11. Several tools and two generators were stolen from a storage container.

Luff Court, unit block, between 10 a.m. and 9:47 p.m. Feb. 11. A game system was stolen from a residence.

Fox Ridge Lane, 900 block, between 7 a.m. and 5:40 p.m. Feb. 11. A computer, game system and other items were stolen from a residence. Someone entered the home through a basement window and exited through a back door.

Copyright © 2015, CT Now
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