Longwood Gardens

In 1700, a Quaker family named Peirce purchased the property from <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PEHST001555" title="William Penn" href="/topic/arts-culture/william-penn-PEHST001555.topic">William Penn</a>, established a working farm and, in 1798, began an arboretum. By 1850, the site held one of the finest collections of trees in the nation. The farm was purchased in 1906 by Pierre du Pont to keep the trees from being cut for timber. From 1907 until the 1930s, du Pont created most of what is there today, including the enormous conservatory and the 10,000-pipe organ.<br>
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<b>What’s blooming:</b> Lilytopia, May 20-30. The East Conservatory will showcase of the newest varieties of lilies from the <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO00000041" title="Netherlands" href="/topic/international/netherlands-PLGEO00000041.topic">Netherlands</a>. And there will be a display of more than 10,000 cut stems by Dutch floral designer Dorien van den Berg.

( JED KIRSCHBAUM, Baltimore Sun / April 18, 2006 )

In 1700, a Quaker family named Peirce purchased the property from William Penn, established a working farm and, in 1798, began an arboretum. By 1850, the site held one of the finest collections of trees in the nation. The farm was purchased in 1906 by Pierre du Pont to keep the trees from being cut for timber. From 1907 until the 1930s, du Pont created most of what is there today, including the enormous conservatory and the 10,000-pipe organ.

What’s blooming: Lilytopia, May 20-30. The East Conservatory will showcase of the newest varieties of lilies from the Netherlands. And there will be a display of more than 10,000 cut stems by Dutch floral designer Dorien van den Berg.

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