Submarine in ice

Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLS) employee Keith Magness uses a chainsaw to cut through ice on the hatches of the Seawolf class submarine USS <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100200000000" title="Connecticut" href="/topic/us/connecticut-PLGEO100100200000000.topic">Connecticut</a> after the boat surfaced through Arctic sea ice during an exercise near the 2011 APLS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100101400000000" title="Alaska" href="/topic/us/alaska-PLGEO100101400000000.topic">Alaska</a>. The new digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system built by <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ORCRP012915" title="Raytheon Company" href="/topic/business/raytheon-company-ORCRP012915.topic">Raytheon Co</a> could revolutionize how military commanders stay in touch with submarines all over the world, allowing them to alert a submarine about an enemy ship on the surface or a new mission, without it needing to surface to periscope level, or 60 feet, where it could be detected by potential enemies.

( Reuters photo / March 23, 2011 )

Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLS) employee Keith Magness uses a chainsaw to cut through ice on the hatches of the Seawolf class submarine USS Connecticut after the boat surfaced through Arctic sea ice during an exercise near the 2011 APLS camp north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. The new digital "Deep Siren" tactical messaging system built by Raytheon Co could revolutionize how military commanders stay in touch with submarines all over the world, allowing them to alert a submarine about an enemy ship on the surface or a new mission, without it needing to surface to periscope level, or 60 feet, where it could be detected by potential enemies.

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