<span style="font-size:20px; font-face: arial; font-weight: 900;">
<p>Frank Kohler, 50, of Tall Timbers</p></span><br>
<span style="font-size: 14px; font-family: georgia">


<p>Frank Kohler lived in St. Mary's County with his wife. He served as past president of the Rotary Club in Lexington Park, current club president Jack Pappas said.</p><br>
<p>"Our motto is service above self and that's what he did," Pappas said. "He was a family man. He had two daughters and was just a nice man. You'd like him for a neighbor."</p><br>
<p>A family member in Zelienople, Pa., where Kohler once lived, declined to comment on the family's behalf. A Navy spokesperson said Kohler worked as an independent contractor and was at the Navy Yard for a meeting.</p><br>
<p>Kohler and his wife, Michelle, are listed as vice president and president, respectively, of Computer Management Systems Inc., based in Tall Timbers. A LinkedIn profile identifies Frank Kohler as a senior system engineer.</p><br>
<p>He graduated from Slippery Rock University in Butler County, Pa. in 1985 with a degree in computer science, according to a university spokeswoman.</p><br>
<p>Neighbors said he and his wife had two daughters. "Great guy, good family man, good boater," said Rick Meatyard, who owns a nearby marina.</p><br>
<p>Kohler oversaw the chapter about eight years ago, leading the club of about 100 members who support about 30 local charities and hand out between 20 and 30 college scholarships a year, Pappas said.</p><br>
<p>The year after Kohler served as president, he was the club's "King Oyster" in charge of organizing the rotary's annual United States Oyster Festival, which takes place in October at the St. Mary's County Fairgrounds. Besides having the skills and ability to pull together one of area's largest seafood festivals, Pappas said, the festival's "king" must also be a bit of a showman.</p><br>
<p>"He gets to wear a crown and a big heavy red robe and carry a scepter, all very nautical," Pappas said. "Rotary is a charitable thing but fellowship is a big thing as well."</p><br>
<p><p align="right"><i>--Justin George, Joseph Tanfani, Tribune Washington Bureau, and Rick Wills, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review</i></p></p><br>
<p></span>

( Steve Ruark / Patuxent Publishing / October 22, 2006 )

Frank Kohler, 50, of Tall Timbers


Frank Kohler lived in St. Mary's County with his wife. He served as past president of the Rotary Club in Lexington Park, current club president Jack Pappas said.


"Our motto is service above self and that's what he did," Pappas said. "He was a family man. He had two daughters and was just a nice man. You'd like him for a neighbor."


A family member in Zelienople, Pa., where Kohler once lived, declined to comment on the family's behalf. A Navy spokesperson said Kohler worked as an independent contractor and was at the Navy Yard for a meeting.


Kohler and his wife, Michelle, are listed as vice president and president, respectively, of Computer Management Systems Inc., based in Tall Timbers. A LinkedIn profile identifies Frank Kohler as a senior system engineer.


He graduated from Slippery Rock University in Butler County, Pa. in 1985 with a degree in computer science, according to a university spokeswoman.


Neighbors said he and his wife had two daughters. "Great guy, good family man, good boater," said Rick Meatyard, who owns a nearby marina.


Kohler oversaw the chapter about eight years ago, leading the club of about 100 members who support about 30 local charities and hand out between 20 and 30 college scholarships a year, Pappas said.


The year after Kohler served as president, he was the club's "King Oyster" in charge of organizing the rotary's annual United States Oyster Festival, which takes place in October at the St. Mary's County Fairgrounds. Besides having the skills and ability to pull together one of area's largest seafood festivals, Pappas said, the festival's "king" must also be a bit of a showman.


"He gets to wear a crown and a big heavy red robe and carry a scepter, all very nautical," Pappas said. "Rotary is a charitable thing but fellowship is a big thing as well."


--Justin George, Joseph Tanfani, Tribune Washington Bureau, and Rick Wills, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook