La Paix, off York Road

When F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald arrived here in 1932, they'd been married more than 10 years, the glamorous ones well past. They came to Baltimore so Zelda, who had suffered her second breakdown, could be treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital's Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic.
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Suffering from schizophrenia, she was mentally unraveling. His career had stalled and he was drinking himself into stupors. They'd both had affairs. Yet when they got to town, they still had hope, both for their careers and their relationship.
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"A love story it kind of wasn't by this time," says Margaret Galambos, a longtime member of the Fitzgerald Society who led a bus tour through Baltimore during the organization's 2009 national conference in Baltimore. "It was not their best of times."
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When they arrived, they rented a gabled Victorian called La Paix (pictured), off York Road on the ground of what's now St. Joseph Medical Center.
<BR><I>-- Jill Rosen</I>

( File photo / May 20, 2004 )

When F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald arrived here in 1932, they'd been married more than 10 years, the glamorous ones well past. They came to Baltimore so Zelda, who had suffered her second breakdown, could be treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital's Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic.

Suffering from schizophrenia, she was mentally unraveling. His career had stalled and he was drinking himself into stupors. They'd both had affairs. Yet when they got to town, they still had hope, both for their careers and their relationship.

"A love story it kind of wasn't by this time," says Margaret Galambos, a longtime member of the Fitzgerald Society who led a bus tour through Baltimore during the organization's 2009 national conference in Baltimore. "It was not their best of times."

When they arrived, they rented a gabled Victorian called La Paix (pictured), off York Road on the ground of what's now St. Joseph Medical Center.
-- Jill Rosen

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