Lazy Baker's Almond Biscotti

These cookies are not technically biscotti because they are baked just once. (Real biscotti are baked, sliced and baked a second time to dry them out.) The single baking makes them simpler to make and softer to eat, so they are tasty even when they're not dunked. The results are sweet and spicy, but not too sinful since most of the fat comes from heart-healthful nuts. This is a family recipe that came my way via my father's half-cousin-in-law. The genealogy is more complicated than the recipe itself; the dough comes together in just a few minutes. The cookies can be made with whole almonds, but using slivered ensures a nut in every bite.<i>-- Laura Vozzella</i><br>
<br>
<b>Makes:</b> About 75 cookies<br>
<br>
1 cup sugar <BR>
1 cup brown sugar<BR>
1/2 teaspoon cloves<BR>
2 teaspoons cinnamon<BR>
2 teaspoons baking powder<BR>
2 eggs<BR>
1/3 cup oil<BR>
2 tablespoons water, plus 1 teaspoon, divided use<BR>
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour<BR>
2 cups slivered almonds<BR>
1 egg yolk<br>
<br>
<br>
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease and flour two cookie sheets. Combine the sugars, spices, baking powder, eggs, oil and 2 tablespoons of water. Mix in flour, then fold in almonds. (The dough will be stiff as Play-Doh, so it is easiest to incorporate the nuts with your hands.) Using your hands, roll the dough into three snakes, about 12 inches long. Flatten each roll into a thickness of about 1 inch. Place on the cookie sheets. Mix the egg yolk with the remaining teaspoon of water and brush on the tops of the dough. Bake for 20 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack. When completely cool, slice the cookies crosswise into 63/47-inch pieces.<br>
<br>
<i>Per serving: 64 calories, 3 grams fat, trace saturated fat, 1 gram protein, 9 grams carbohydrate, 1 gram fiber, 8 milligrams cholesterol, 13 milligrams sodium</i>

( Sun photo by Lloyd Fox / December 2, 2009 )

These cookies are not technically biscotti because they are baked just once. (Real biscotti are baked, sliced and baked a second time to dry them out.) The single baking makes them simpler to make and softer to eat, so they are tasty even when they're not dunked. The results are sweet and spicy, but not too sinful since most of the fat comes from heart-healthful nuts. This is a family recipe that came my way via my father's half-cousin-in-law. The genealogy is more complicated than the recipe itself; the dough comes together in just a few minutes. The cookies can be made with whole almonds, but using slivered ensures a nut in every bite.-- Laura Vozzella

Makes: About 75 cookies

1 cup sugar
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cloves
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs
1/3 cup oil
2 tablespoons water, plus 1 teaspoon, divided use
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups slivered almonds
1 egg yolk


Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease and flour two cookie sheets. Combine the sugars, spices, baking powder, eggs, oil and 2 tablespoons of water. Mix in flour, then fold in almonds. (The dough will be stiff as Play-Doh, so it is easiest to incorporate the nuts with your hands.) Using your hands, roll the dough into three snakes, about 12 inches long. Flatten each roll into a thickness of about 1 inch. Place on the cookie sheets. Mix the egg yolk with the remaining teaspoon of water and brush on the tops of the dough. Bake for 20 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack. When completely cool, slice the cookies crosswise into 63/47-inch pieces.

Per serving: 64 calories, 3 grams fat, trace saturated fat, 1 gram protein, 9 grams carbohydrate, 1 gram fiber, 8 milligrams cholesterol, 13 milligrams sodium

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