Zombie makeover

When you're a model, isn't the point of a makeup session supposed to be making you look better?
<br><br>
Not if you're Trish Stampone (our zombie above), and not if your ambition is to be gory perfection as a zombie ballerina at this weekend's Zombie Gras.
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"It's going to be like a whole new world," says Stampone, 28, who's counting on make-up artist Patrick Boyer Jr. (aka Boneman, above left) to make her look absolutely dreadful for Saturday's (March 29) undead event. This marks the fourth year for the zombie mash-up, which begins with a gathering/party at Geppi's Entertainment Museum, then lurches its way on to a handful of bars and pubs in the Inner Harbor area.
<br><br>
Boyer, who credits his mom with planting the seed that would eventually lead to his secondary career as a makeup artist (he's an IT consultant by day), usually works on his own face. Monsters are his specialty, he says -- especially Frankenstein's monster. 
<br><br>
"He's not really a bad dude," Boyer says. "He just looks scary. I can relate to that."
<br><br>
But turning an attractive young woman into a pile of decaying flesh? What makeup artist could resist such a challenge?
<br><br>
"Oh yeah, I love it, man, especially the lovely young ladies," he says, adding a positively demonic "heh heh heh."
<br><br>
In all, it takes about two hours and several applications of foam, contact lenses, heavy makeup and other prosthetics for Boyer to make Stampone into something positively repulsive. The result is absolutely horrifying. Stampone is delighted, and can't wait to take her undead act onto the streets of Baltimore Saturday.
<br><br>
"When you see yourself, you can almost feel that character becoming part of you," she says. "You just turn around and you're that person."
<br><br>
Of course, it helps that she'll be able to wash everything off when it's over and return to the land of the living, right? Maybe her future modeling gigs won't be so giddily repellent? Stampone's counting on it. 
<br><br>
"Hopefully," she says with a smile, "I won't get stuck on the zombie character." <i>-- By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun</i>

( Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun / March 26, 2014 )

When you're a model, isn't the point of a makeup session supposed to be making you look better?

Not if you're Trish Stampone (our zombie above), and not if your ambition is to be gory perfection as a zombie ballerina at this weekend's Zombie Gras.

"It's going to be like a whole new world," says Stampone, 28, who's counting on make-up artist Patrick Boyer Jr. (aka Boneman, above left) to make her look absolutely dreadful for Saturday's (March 29) undead event. This marks the fourth year for the zombie mash-up, which begins with a gathering/party at Geppi's Entertainment Museum, then lurches its way on to a handful of bars and pubs in the Inner Harbor area.

Boyer, who credits his mom with planting the seed that would eventually lead to his secondary career as a makeup artist (he's an IT consultant by day), usually works on his own face. Monsters are his specialty, he says -- especially Frankenstein's monster.

"He's not really a bad dude," Boyer says. "He just looks scary. I can relate to that."

But turning an attractive young woman into a pile of decaying flesh? What makeup artist could resist such a challenge?

"Oh yeah, I love it, man, especially the lovely young ladies," he says, adding a positively demonic "heh heh heh."

In all, it takes about two hours and several applications of foam, contact lenses, heavy makeup and other prosthetics for Boyer to make Stampone into something positively repulsive. The result is absolutely horrifying. Stampone is delighted, and can't wait to take her undead act onto the streets of Baltimore Saturday.

"When you see yourself, you can almost feel that character becoming part of you," she says. "You just turn around and you're that person."

Of course, it helps that she'll be able to wash everything off when it's over and return to the land of the living, right? Maybe her future modeling gigs won't be so giddily repellent? Stampone's counting on it.

"Hopefully," she says with a smile, "I won't get stuck on the zombie character." -- By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun

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