Arrest made in bombing plot

A 21-year-old Baltimore County man, whose <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ORCRP006023" title="Facebook" href="/topic/business/technology-industry/facebook-ORCRP006023.topic">Facebook</a> postings about jihad gave way to discussions with an <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="ORGOV000008" title="FBI" href="/topic/crime-law-justice/fbi-ORGOV000008.topic">FBI</a> informant about how to kill American soldiers, was arrested Wednesday after authorities say he tried to blow up a Catonsville military recruiting center using a car bomb supplied by undercover agents.<br>
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Federal authorities said <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PESPT004681" title="Antonio Martinez" href="/topic/crime-law-justice/crime/antonio-martinez-PESPT004681.topic">Antonio Martinez</a>, a recent convert to Islam who called himself Muhammad Hussain, watched videos of <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PECLB20372037" title="Osama bin Laden" href="/topic/unrest-conflicts-war/terrorism/osama-bin-laden-PECLB20372037.topic">Osama bin Laden</a> and mused about "dying for the cause" by joining militant forces overseas.Unable to afford to travel to <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO00000020" title="Pakistan" href="/topic/international/pakistan-PLGEO00000020.topic">Pakistan</a> or Afghanistan, Martinez instead proposed hitting local military installations to send a message. Officials say those plans culminated when he parked an SUV equipped with a dummy bomb in a suburban parking lot not far from his home.<br>
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It was the second FBI sting in as many weeks against an alleged homegrown terrorist trying to detonate a powerful car bomb, and like a recently foiled plot in Oregon, federal agents were watching the whole time.<br>
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Authorities described Martinez as a "lone wolf" who never posed a threat to the public and had no ties to terrorist organizations. But the investigation showed he was "absolutely committed to carrying out an attack which would have cost lives," said Richard A. McFeely, special agent in charge of the FBI's Baltimore field office.

( Kim Hairston, BALTIMORE SUN / December 8, 2010 )

A 21-year-old Baltimore County man, whose Facebook postings about jihad gave way to discussions with an FBI informant about how to kill American soldiers, was arrested Wednesday after authorities say he tried to blow up a Catonsville military recruiting center using a car bomb supplied by undercover agents.

Federal authorities said Antonio Martinez, a recent convert to Islam who called himself Muhammad Hussain, watched videos of Osama bin Laden and mused about "dying for the cause" by joining militant forces overseas.Unable to afford to travel to Pakistan or Afghanistan, Martinez instead proposed hitting local military installations to send a message. Officials say those plans culminated when he parked an SUV equipped with a dummy bomb in a suburban parking lot not far from his home.

It was the second FBI sting in as many weeks against an alleged homegrown terrorist trying to detonate a powerful car bomb, and like a recently foiled plot in Oregon, federal agents were watching the whole time.

Authorities described Martinez as a "lone wolf" who never posed a threat to the public and had no ties to terrorist organizations. But the investigation showed he was "absolutely committed to carrying out an attack which would have cost lives," said Richard A. McFeely, special agent in charge of the FBI's Baltimore field office.

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